Sophie’s choice


Sophie’s choice is an amazing, heart-breaking, and quite an emotionally intense book.

I first got to know about it through its movie adaptation.

Since then, whenever I face a hard choice, I remember it.

A part of my anxiety is because I cannot decide what is the best choice. Shall I notify someone before I cc them in an email? Shall I take this collaboration, or leave it as it is? Shall I say something or not?

These may sound like easy choices, but when you try to calculate risk of your steps and cannot take the risk associated with either of the solutions, it becomes a trouble.

To be clear, I take risks. When I hire someone, when I step up for something, when I go for an interview, when I submit a report, when I want to move in a new direction, live in a new country/city, and when I decide what is best for me in life.

It is a some sort of dilemma that while I can take these risky moves, I sometimes cannot decide what to do with relatively less important things.

The idea of the book is that even you are forced to make decisions that are otherwise seem impossible, sometimes the end result may not change or differ. Not everything is in our power – it is sometimes highly dependent on other parties involved. Sometimes it is just screwed in any way.

Knowing this does not relieve my attention on the hardship of some decisions.

Let me hear your thoughts and advice.

One thought on “Sophie’s choice

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  1. Why would you notify someone before CC’ing them in an email? Presumably the message involves them or is on a topic known to them. I suppose the real question is whether or not the primary recipient wants the information shared.

    Anyway, what I mean to write in response is that I, too, spend too long making decisions. In the end, though, I usually find I can happily live with whichever choice I have made and forget about the path I didn’t take.

    Liked by 1 person

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